Panta Rhei benchmark dataset: socio-hydrological data of paired events of floods and droughts

Heidi Kreibich*, Kai Schröter, Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Anne F. Van Loon, Maurizio Mazzoleni, Guta Wakbulcho Abeshu, Svetlana Agafonova, Amir Aghakouchak, Hafzullah Aksoy, Camila Alvarez-Garreton, Blanca Aznar, Laila Balkhi, Marlies H. Barendrecht, Sylvain Biancamaria, Liduin Bos-Burgering, Chris Bradley, Yus Budiyono, Wouter Buytaert, Lucinda Capewell, Hayley CarlsonYonca Cavus, Anaïs Couasnon, Gemma Coxon, Ioannis Daliakopoulos, Marleen C. De Ruiter, Claire Delus, Mathilde Erfurt, Giuseppe Esposito, Didier François, Frédéric Frappart, Jim Freer, Natalia Frolova, Animesh K. Gain, Manolis Grillakis, Jordi Oriol Grima, Diego A. Guzmán, Laurie S. Huning, Monica Ionita, Maxim Kharlamov, Dao Nguyen Khoi, Natalie Kieboom, Maria Kireeva, Aristeidis Koutroulis, Waldo Lavado-Casimiro, Hong Yi Li, Maria Carmen Llasat, David Macdonald, Johanna Mård, Hannah Mathew-Richards, Andrew Mckenzie, Alfonso Mejia, Eduardo Mario Mendiondo, Marjolein Mens, Shifteh Mobini, Guilherme Samprogna Mohor, Viorica Nagavciuc, Thanh Ngo-Duc, Huynh Thi Thao Nguyen, Pham Thi Thao Nhi, Olga Petrucci, Nguyen Hong Quan, Pere Quintana-Seguí, Saman Razavi, Elena Ridolfi, Jannik Riegel, Md Shibly Sadik, Nivedita Sairam, Elisa Savelli, Alexey Sazonov, Sanjib Sharma, Johanna Sörensen, Felipe Augusto Arguello Souza, Kerstin Stahl, Max Steinhausen, Michael Stoelzle, Wiwiana Szalińska, Qiuhong Tang, Fuqiang Tian, Tamara Tokarczyk, Carolina Tovar, Thi Van Thu Tran, Marjolein H.J. Van Huijgevoort, Michelle T.H. Van Vliet, Sergiy Vorogushyn, Thorsten Wagener, Yueling Wang, Doris E. Wendt, Elliot Wickham, Long Yang, Mauricio Zambrano-Bigiarini, Philip J. Ward

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2 Atıf (Scopus)

Özet

As the adverse impacts of hydrological extremes increase in many regions of the world, a better understanding of the drivers of changes in risk and impacts is essential for effective flood and drought risk management and climate adaptation. However, there is currently a lack of comprehensive, empirical data about the processes, interactions, and feedbacks in complex human-water systems leading to flood and drought impacts. Here we present a benchmark dataset containing socio-hydrological data of paired events, i.e. two floods or two droughts that occurred in the same area. The 45 paired events occurred in 42 different study areas and cover a wide range of socio-economic and hydro-climatic conditions. The dataset is unique in covering both floods and droughts, in the number of cases assessed and in the quantity of socio-hydrological data. The benchmark dataset comprises (1) detailed review-style reports about the events and key processes between the two events of a pair; (2) the key data table containing variables that assess the indicators which characterize management shortcomings, hazard, exposure, vulnerability, and impacts of all events; and (3) a table of the indicators of change that indicate the differences between the first and second event of a pair. The advantages of the dataset are that it enables comparative analyses across all the paired events based on the indicators of change and allows for detailed context- and location-specific assessments based on the extensive data and reports of the individual study areas. The dataset can be used by the scientific community for exploratory data analyses, e.g. focused on causal links between risk management; changes in hazard, exposure and vulnerability; and flood or drought impacts. The data can also be used for the development, calibration, and validation of socio-hydrological models. The dataset is available to the public through the GFZ Data Services (Kreibich et al., 2023, 10.5880/GFZ.4.4.2023.001).

Orijinal dilİngilizce
Sayfa (başlangıç-bitiş)2009-2023
Sayfa sayısı15
DergiEarth System Science Data
Hacim15
Basın numarası5
DOI'lar
Yayın durumuYayınlandı - 16 May 2023

Bibliyografik not

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Heidi Kreibich et al.

Finansman

The work, particularly data collection, was partly undertaken under the framework of the following entities and projects: Center for Climate and Resilience Research (ANID/FONDAP/1522A0001), joint research project ANID/NSFC190018, project ANID/FSEQ210001, PIRAGUA project funded by FEDER through the POCTEFA Programme of the EU, M-CostAdapt project (FEDER/MICINN-AEI/CTM2017-83655-C2-2-R), project RIESGOS (BMBF, 03G0876B), project DECIDER (BMBF, 01LZ1703G), project FLOOD (01LP1903E) as part of the ClimXtreme Research Network, HUMID project (CGL2017-85687-R, AEI/FEDER, UE), project funded by the US National Science Foundation (EAR no. 1804560), NASA award no. NNX15AC27G and NOAA award no. NA19OAR4310294, CENTA NERC grant (NE/lL002493/1), Groundwater Drought Initiative (NE/R004994/1), MaRIUS and ENDOWS projects funded by NERC grant number NE/L010399/1, NERC RAHU project grant NE/S013210/1, AWI Strategy Fund Project PalEX, Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM, Russian Science Foundation (project no. 19-77-10032), Turkish State Meteorological Service, Formas (grant no. 942-2015-149), Vietnam National University–Ho Chi Minh City under grant number C2018-48-01, Vietnam National Foundation for Science and Technology Development (grant no. 105.06-2019.20), the US National Science Foundation project (EAR #1804560), MSCA ETN System-Risk (grant 676027), the Russian Foundation for Basic Research project (no. 18-05-60021-Arctic), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 92047301), CNES TOSCA grant SWHYM, the University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources California Institute for Water Resources and US Geological Survey (grant no. G21AP10611-00), and a California State University Water Resources and Policy Initiatives grant. David Macdonald and Andrew McKenzie publish with the permission of the Director, British Geological Survey. Funding for their input was provided by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) National Capability resources, devolved to the British Geological Survey, and through the LANDWISE project (NERC; grant no. NE/R004668/1). Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications has not received any payments from Russian or Belarusian institutions for this paper. Elisa Savelli received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) within the project “HydroSocialExtremes: Uncovering the Mutual Shaping of Hydrological Extremes and Society” (ERC Consolidator Grant, grant no. 771678). Elena Ridolfi was supported by the Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS) in Sweden. Thorsten Wagener was partially supported by a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (WM170042) and by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in the framework of the Alexander von Humboldt Professorship endowed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Jim Freer was partly supported by the Global Water Futures program, University of Saskatchewan. Yonca Cavus was supported by the DAAD “Research Grants – Bi-nationally Supervised Doctoral Degrees/Cotutelle” Program. Hafzullah Aksoy performed a portion of his contribution to this study during his stay at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA, supported by a Fulbright Academic Research Scholarship, Istanbul Technical University (project no. MUA-2019-42094), and the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK). Dao Nguyen Khoi was supported by the Vietnam National Foundation for Science and Technology Development (grant no. 105.06-2019.20). Qiuhong Tang was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 41730645, 41790424). Philip Ward was supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) (VIDI; grant no. 016.161.324) and the MYRIAD-EU project, which received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement no. 101003276). Maurizio Mazzoleni was supported by the Swedish Research Council Formas and the Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS) in Sweden. Laurie Huning was partially supported by the University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources California Institute for Water Resources and US Geological Survey (grant no. G21AP10611-00) and a California State University Water Resources and Policy Initiatives grant. Anaïs Couasnon was supported by a VIDI grant from NWO that was awarded to Philip Ward (grant no. 016.161.324). Marleen de Ruiter was supported by the MYRIAD-EU project, which received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement no. 101003276). Animesh K. Gain was financially supported by the Marie Skłodowska Curie Global Fellowship of the European Commission (grant agreement no. 787419) and Murdoch University, Australia. Liduin Bos-Burgering and Marjolein Mens were supported by the Deltares research program on water resources, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate. Fuqiang Tian was partly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 92047301). Johanna Mård was supported by the Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS). Wouter Buytaert acknowledges funding from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (grant no. NE/S013210/1). Gemma Coxon was funded by a UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship award 9MR/V022857/10. Saman Razavi, Hayley Carlson, and Laila Balkhi were supported by the Integrated Modelling Program for Canada. Huynh Thi Thao Nguyen was supported by the NUFFIC/NICHE VNM 104 project, which was co-funded by the Netherlands Government and Vietnam National University–Ho Chi Minh City. Michelle van Vliet was financially supported by a VIDI grant (project no. VI.Vidi.193.019) of the Netherlands Scientific Organisation (NWO). Anne Van Loon was supported by the European Research Council (ERC) project “PerfectSTORM: Storylines of future extremes” (ERC-2020-StG 948601). Guta Worku Abeshu and Hong-Yi Li were supported as part of the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) project, funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Thanh Ngo-Duc was supported by the Vietnam National Foundation for Science and Technology Development (grant no. 105.06-2021.14). María Carmen Llasat was supported by the C3RiskMed research project (Grant PID2020-113638RB-C22) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033.

FinansörlerFinansör numarası
CENTA NERCNE/lL002493/1
ClimXtreme Research NetworkCGL2017-85687-R
Groundwater Drought InitiativeNE/R004994/1
Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM
Integrated Modelling Program for Canada
MYRIAD-EU
Murdoch University, Australia
NERC RAHU
Netherlands Government and Vietnam National UniversityVI.Vidi.193.019
Netherlands Scientific OrganisationERC-2020-StG 948601
Turkish State Meteorological Service, Formas942-2015-149
University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources California Institute for Water Resources
Vietnam National UniversityC2018-48-01
National Science Foundation1804560
U.S. Department of Energy
National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNNX15AC27G
National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNA19OAR4310294
U.S. Geological SurveyG21AP10611-00
Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung
Office of Science
Biological and Environmental Research105.06-2021.14, PID2020-113638RB-C22
National Foundation for Science and Technology DevelopmentEAR #1804560, 105.06-2019.20
California State University
University of Saskatchewan
Fulbright Association
H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions676027
UK Research and Innovation9MR/V022857/10
Centrum för naturkatastrofslära, Uppsala Universitet
German Academic Exchange Service
Niche
Natural Environment Research CouncilNE/S013210/1, NE/L010399/1
Royal SocietyWM170042
European Commission01LZ1703G, 03G0876B, 01LP1903E, FEDER/MICINN-AEI/CTM2017-83655-C2-2-R, 787419
European Research Council771678
Netherlands Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education
National Natural Science Foundation of China92047301, 41790424, 41730645
Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas
Russian Foundation for Basic Research18-05-60021-Arctic
Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung
British Geological SurveyNE/R004668/1
Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research
Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek016.161.324
Türkiye Bilimsel ve Teknolojik Araştırma Kurumu
Ministerio de Ciencia e InnovaciónMCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033
Russian Science Foundation19-77-10032
Istanbul Teknik ÜniversitesiMUA-2019-42094
Horizon 2020101003276
Ministerie van Economische Zaken en Klimaat

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