Sound transmission loss of LC3-based mortars with barite and waste rubber

Begüm Söyek Abay*, Leyla Tanaçan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates developing a single-layer composite material to provide acoustical comfort conditions due to sound transmission in a building. The aim of the study is to increase the sound transmission loss (STL) of mortars produced with LC3 (limestone calcined clay cements)1 ecological binder, barite, and rubber aggregates compared to Portland cement and river sand aggregate mortars. The flow and aggregate/binder ratios by volume in each mortar mixture were kept constant and compared. Instead of river sand aggregate, barite aggregate was used to provide weight, which is one of the most important parameters effective in sound insulation and waste rubber aggregate was used to control stiffness. Mortars were produced in 40 × 40 × 160 mm for experimental analyses that include unit weight, capillary of water absorption, open porosity, and compressive and flexural strengths, while in 90 mm thick cylindrical mortars were produced for sound transmission loss measurements. As a result of the experimental study, it is revealed that mortar with LC3 binder, two-part barite, and 1-part waste rubber aggregate by volume (LC3-2B1R-8) can be used as an acoustical material for sound insulation. Using combined aggregates (barite and rubber) for increasing the sound insulation properties of the mortar is very effective not only in high frequencies but also in low frequencies. The study also shows that increasing the weight of the mortars does not always increase the sound insulation properties of the material.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-528
Number of pages26
JournalBuilding Acoustics
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022.

Funding

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research article is the product of the Ph.D. Thesis written by Begüm Söyek Abay from the Graduate School of Istanbul Technical University and supported by the ITU Center for Scientific Research Projects [grant number 42480]. Portland cement (PC), metakaolin, limestone and river sand, barite and waste rubber were supplied from ÇimSa, Kaolin, Istanbul Technical University-TICEM, Adoçim, and Gazisan companies, respectively. The authors express their gratitude to companies for supplying the materials, TSE, Construction Materials, Fire and Acoustic Laboratory team members for the impedance tube measurements, İbrahim Öztürk for testing the materials in Building Materials Laboratory, ITU, Faculty of Architecture. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research article is the product of the Ph.D. Thesis written by Begüm Söyek Abay from the Graduate School of Istanbul Technical University and supported by the ITU Center for Scientific Research Projects [grant number 42480]. Portland cement (PC), metakaolin, limestone and river sand, barite and waste rubber were supplied from ÇimSa, Kaolin, Istanbul Technical University-TICEM, Adoçim, and Gazisan companies, respectively. The authors express their gratitude to companies for supplying the materials, TSE, Construction Materials, Fire and Acoustic Laboratory team members for the impedance tube measurements, İbrahim Öztürk for testing the materials in Building Materials Laboratory, ITU, Faculty of Architecture.

FundersFunder number
Acoustic Laboratory
Building Materials Laboratory
ITU Center for Scientific Research Projects42480
International Technological University
Istanbul Teknik Üniversitesi

    Keywords

    • barite aggregate
    • LC binder
    • rubber aggregate
    • Sound insulation

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