Smart Thermally Actuating Textiles

Vanessa Sanchez, Christopher J. Payne, Daniel J. Preston, Jonathan T. Alvarez, James C. Weaver, Asli T. Atalay, Mustafa Boyvat, Daniel M. Vogt, Robert J. Wood, George M. Whitesides, Conor J. Walsh*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soft robots have attracted attention for biomedical and consumer devices. However, most of these robots are pneumatically actuated, requiring a tether and thus limiting wearable applications that require multiple controlled actuators. By pairing liquid-vapor phase change actuation with a textile-based laminated manufacturing method, smart thermally actuating textiles (STATs) eliminate the need for a pneumatic tether. STATs are lightweight and unobtrusive for wearable applications and exploit a facile manufacturing approach that supports arbitrary customization of the form factor and easy creation of connected arrays of individual robotic modules. Through integrated sensing and heating elements, STATs demonstrate closed-loop feedback that enables dynamic pressure control in the presence of environmental temperature fluctuations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2000383
JournalAdvanced Materials Technologies
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

Funding

This research was partly funded by the National Science Foundation EFRI, Award (No. 1830896), NSF MRSEC award DMR-1420570, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. V.S. acknowledges the support of the United States Department of Defense through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship Program and the National GEM Consortium through the GEM Fellowship. The authors would like to thank Ozgur Atalay for discussions and Max Rousseau for fabrication videography. This research was partly funded by the National Science Foundation EFRI, Award (No. 1830896), NSF MRSEC award DMR‐1420570, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. V.S. acknowledges the support of the United States Department of Defense through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship Program and the National GEM Consortium through the GEM Fellowship. The authors would like to thank Ozgur Atalay for discussions and Max Rousseau for fabrication videography.

FundersFunder number
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
NSF MRSEC
National Science Foundation EFRI
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
National Science Foundation1830896
U.S. Department of Defense
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Harvard UniversityDMR‐1420570
National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate
Hansjörg Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University

    Keywords

    • phase change actuators
    • robotic textiles
    • soft actuators
    • soft devices
    • soft sensors

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