Degradation of subµ-sized bioplastics by clinically important bacteria under sediment and seawater conditions: Impact on the bacteria responses

Hasan Saygin, Asli Baysal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the interaction of submicron-sized bioplastics with environmentally and clinically important bacteria under seawater and sediment conditions. To examine the relationship between submicron-sized bioplastics and bacteria in seawater and sediment, we focused on the bacterial activation and their biochemical key events toward the protein, carbohydrate, lipid, and antioxidant response. In addition, culture-dependent biofilm formation on submicron-sized bioplastics and their characterization was performed. The results indicated that selected bacteria increased their viability both in seawater and sediment with the submicron-sized bioplastics in that the bioplastics decreased their mass at the level of 10–23%. However, the activation level and mechanism affected the polymer type, bacteria, and environmental media, and submicron-sized bioplastics promoted biofilm formation with enhancing basophilic characteristics of biofilms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-20
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • Biodegradable polymers
  • biodegradation
  • biofilm
  • nanoplastics
  • pathogen
  • seawater
  • sediment

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